In the last 10 years, the development charity Cricket Without Boundaries (CWB) has trained over a quarter of a million children in 5 African countries. Alongside those children we have trained over 3500 adults as ICC cricket coaches. More importantly, through every one of those children and coaches, we have raised awareness of HIV/AIDS and FGM; and that awareness is now cascading through communities, reaching countless individuals.

Despite only taking up running 18 months ago Jules Farman is about to take on a 60 mile run over the Pennines between Leeds and Manchester in 2.5 days to raise awareness about FGM.

On May Day Bank Holiday Monday, Ickenham Ladies CC held their annual 6 aside ladies cricket tournament raising money for their two chosen charities Cricket Without Boundaries and CURA UK.

Last year a team of anti-FGM campaigners from the charity 28 Too Many and Cricket Coaches from Cricket Without Boundaries, headed out to Laikipia, Kenya to help the Maasai Cricket Warriors in their mission to end the practice of FGM within their community.

The LCCC Foundation is proud to announce the formation of a new partnership with Cricket Without Boundaries (CWB), to help develop and deliver an anti-female genital mutilation (FGM) and female empowerment programme using cricket as the medium to engage and educate.

Since the three trustees set off on an African cricket adventure in 2005, CWB has coached over 180,000 children, promoting key health messaging and inclusivity in seven African Countries. The job is not done though, and we need your help to do more!

As CWB enters its 11th year as a charity, we have a number of exciting volunteering roles that will help grow the charity to empower more local coaches, deliver more social development messages and give more children the joy of playing cricket.

Last February CWB partnered with the MCW and 28 Too Many to deliver its first FGM project in Kenya. Female Genital mutilation also known as cutting is an abusive practice which affects an estimated 200 million women and girls worldwide.

It was 10 years ago when the three of us founding trustees set off to coach cricket from Cairo to Cape Town as CWB’s first project. We had no idea what to expect from those 7 months, let alone what would become of the embryonic charity that we had just set up. Fast forward 10 years later and its 180,000 kids coached across Africa and almost 4,000 new coaches to train them. I know I speak for Andy and Chris when I say it is one of the things we are most proud of.

Celebrating its’ 10th anniversary year CWB ran 5 projects in Autumn 2015, once again visiting Uganda, Rwanda, Kenya, Cameroon and Botswana. Over the course of the 5 projects our volunteers and in-country Ambassadors coached over 16,000 children and trained over 230 teachers and students as cricket coaches.